Anti-Imperialism Then & Now

On the principles of anti-imperialism in view of changes in world capitalism

 

By Michael Pröbsting, Revolutionary Communist International Tendency (RCIT), 4 June 2024, www.thecommunists.net

 

 

 

Contents

 

Introduction

 

Principles of anti-imperialism

 

The relevance of different aspects of the anti-imperialist program in different periods

 

Important changes in the social-economic physiognomy of imperialist capitalism

 

Consequences for Marxists

 

 

* * * * *

 

Introduction

 

 

 

It is an axiom for Marxists that imperialist powers, their rivalry, and their wars are one of the key characteristics of the final stage of capitalism which has been consequently called “the epoch of imperialism”. It is therefore only coherent that the struggle against imperialist aggression and wars has always been an elementary feature of the revolutionary program in modern times.

 

While this has been true since the onset of the imperialist epoch at the beginning of the 20th century, it would be utterly mistaken to imagine that the concrete application of these principles and the relevance of its individual elements remain always one and the same. In fact, the concrete application of this program depends on the specific characteristics of a given historic period within this epoch.

 

In this essay we shall, after a brief summary of the principles of anti-imperialism, elaborate how these principles had to be applied in the different periods in the past and, most importantly, how they need to be applied today. Finally, we will discuss the underlying changes in modern capitalism which influence the concrete application of the anti-imperialist program and the consequences of these changes for Marxist strategy.

 

 

 

Principles of anti-imperialism

 

 

 

We will limit ourselves to briefly summarise the principles of anti-imperialism since we elaborated on this in much detail in two books and other works. [1] Since imperialism is a central feature of modern capitalism, the struggle against it is an elementary feature of working-class policy. In other words, it is the application of the Marxist program and the general methods of the class struggle to the terrain of anti-chauvinist and anti-militarist struggle.

 

The Marxist program against imperialism is based on the axiom that the working class is by its very nature an international class. As such, its interests are in sharpest contrast to those of the imperialist bourgeoisie. Just as the workers of a given enterprise have no common interests with their boss, so has the working class no common interests with the ruling class of a given imperialist state. Quite the opposite, as the workers want to weaken, defeat and finally expropriate the owners of “their” corporation, so do the workers of a given imperialist country desire to weaken, defeat and finally overthrow the ruling class. At the same time, workers in one enterprise share common interests with their colleagues in other companies which is why they jointly organise in trade unions. The same is the case with workers in one country as they fundamentally share the same class interests as their colleagues abroad.

 

Marxists recognize that imperialist capitalism is characterized by global domination of a handful of Great Powers as well as a number of monopolies. Such a system is characterized by irreconcilable contradictions which necessarily provoke crises, tensions and wars. We therefore refute the pacifist illusion that capitalism could somehow overcome such antagonisms and establish a peaceful capitalist world order – a concept first elaborated by Karl Kautsky and later adopted by social democrats and Stalinists. The only way to abolish death and destruction at the hand of poisonous militarism is to smash the Great Powers, overthrow the ruling capitalist and to establish a world federation of workers and peasant republics via the socialist world revolution.

 

For these reasons the workers in imperialist countries will utilize every conflict in which their class enemy is involved in order to advance their interests and to strengthen their fighting power. Historically, this program has been associated with the formula of revolutionary defeatism [2] which the Left Opposition led by Trotsky once defined as follows: “What is meant by the term defeatism? In the whole past history of the party, defeatism was understood to mean desiring the defeat of one’s own government in a war with an external enemy and contributing to such a defeat by methods of internal revolutionary struggle.[3]

 

In the epoch of imperialism, Marxists differentiate between three categories of states: imperialist, (semi-)colonial and (degenerated) workers states. Without understanding the existence of these three fundamental types of class states, it is impossible for socialists to find a correct orientation in the imperialist epoch. “To teach the workers correctly to understand the class character of the state – imperialist, colonial, workers’—and the reciprocal relations between them, as well as the inner contradictions in each of them, enables the workers to draw correct practical conclusions in situation.[4]

 

Corresponding to such different categories of states, Marxists basically differentiate between two types of wars: wars of oppression and wars of liberation. Wars of oppression are conflicts between two reactionary camps in which the working class does not support either side. Examples for such are conflicts between imperialist states or reactionary civil wars. Wars of liberation can be the struggle of a (semi-)colonial country against an imperialist power, of a nationally oppressed people against the dominating nation, of a progressive camp in a civil war or of a (degenerated) workers state. In such conflicts, socialists unambiguously support the anti-imperialist or anti-reactionary camp.

 

Capitalist brigands always conduct a “defensive” war, even when Japan is marching against Shanghai and France against Syria or Morocco. The revolutionary proletariat distinguishes only between wars of oppression and wars of liberation. The character of a war is defined, not by diplomatic falsifications, but by the class which conducts the war and the objective aims it pursues in that war. The wars of the imperialist states, apart from the pretexts and political rhetoric, are of an oppressive character, reactionary and inimical to the people. Only the wars of the proletariat and of the oppressed nations can be characterized as wars of liberation.[5]

 

Different types of wars require different strategies. In conflicts between imperialist states (as well as in other conflicts between equally reactionary camps), the principles of international working-class solidarity require that socialists oppose both camps. They must refuse to side with their own ruling class as well as with that of the opposing imperialist camp: Likewise, socialists totally reject any chauvinist propaganda of the ruling class. Instead of supporting their “own” ruling class, they propagate intransigent class struggle (following the famous phrase of Karl Liebknecht in World War I “The main enemy is at home). This strategy implies in the case of war, as formulated by Lenin and the Bolshevik Party in 1914, that revolutionaries strive for the “transformation of the imperialist war into civil war”, i.e. that they advance the proletariats’ struggle for power under the conditions of war. Such a program is the only way to unite the international working class on an internationalist basis and to break any “patriotic” unity of workers with “their” imperialist bourgeoisie as well as their lackeys inside the workers movement.

 

In conflicts between the imperialist bourgeoisie and oppressed peoples, the RCIT calls workers and popular organizations around the world to act decisively in the spirit of revolutionary anti-imperialism and working class internationalism. They must unconditionally support the oppressed people against the imperialist aggressors and fight for the defeat of the latter. They need to apply the anti-imperialist united front tactic – this means siding with the forces representing these oppressed people without giving political support to their respective leaderships (usually petty bourgeois nationalists or Islamists; sometimes even semicolonial bourgeois states). Socialists in the imperialist countries are obligated to fight merciless against the social-chauvinist supporters of Great Power privileges as well as against the cowardly centrists who abstain from actively supporting the struggle of the oppressed. Socialists support the Anti-Imperialist Patriotism of the oppressed and help them to develop a socialist, internationalist consciousness. Only on the basis of such a program will it be possible for socialists to create the conditions for trust and unity of the workers and poor peasants of the oppressed people with the progressive workers in the imperialist countries. Only on such a fundament will it be possible to unite the international working class on an internationalist basis. Only with such a strategy will it be possible for communists to replace the vacillating petty-bourgeois leaderships of the oppressed masses. [6]

 

 

 

The relevance of different aspects of the anti-imperialist program in different historic periods

 

 

 

While the above-mentioned principles of anti-imperialism are always relevant in the epoch we are living in, their concrete application depends on the concrete form of the capitalist world order and its inner contradictions. Let us give a brief overview.

 

In the first period of the imperialism epoch before 1914, tensions between the imperialist powers (mainly Britain, France, Germany, Russia, U.S. and Japan) were the dominating feature of the world situation. As is well known, these tensions resulted in the devastating World War I in 1914-18. While the large majority of the Second International capitulated and failed to fight consistently against all imperialist powers, the Bolsheviks led by V. I. Lenin organized an internationalist minority – which was the nucleus of the Communist International founded in March 1919 – on the basis of the program of revolutionary defeatism.

 

Another feature of the pre-1914 period, albeit less pronounced as it would become later, were colonial wars of the imperialist powers – mainly but not exclusively by Britain and France – against the peoples of the South resp. popular uprisings against the oppressors. As examples we refer to the anti-British insurrections by the Dervish Movement in Somalia and the Mahdist rebels in Sudan in late 19th century, the uprising of the Herero and the Namaqua against the German rulers in 1904-07 or the so-called Boxer Rebellion in China in 1899-1901.

 

In the period 1914 to 1945 all types of conflicts took a particularly sharp expression. This period saw two world wars – the first being a conflict only between imperialist powers while the second was a combination of inter-imperialist conflicts (U.S., Britain and France against Germany, Italy and Japan), a conflict between an imperialist power and a degenerated workers state (Germany vs. the Soviet Union) as well as national liberation wars (e.g. China vs Japan and the partisan wars in German-occupied Europe). In addition, there were also a number of other national liberation wars (e.g. the Rif War led by Abd el-Krim against Spain and France in 1921-26, the Great Syrian Revolt in 1925, Japan vs China since 1931; Italy vs. Ethiopia in 1935-36) as well as civil wars (e.g. Spain 1936-39) in this period.

 

In all these conflicts, revolutionaries – first the Bolsheviks and the Communist International and later its successor, Trotsky’s Fourth International – took a defeatist position in inter-imperialist conflicts against both camps but supported the oppressed nations, the Soviet Union of anti-fascist Spain in their wars of liberation.

 

The period after World War II – more precisely, it started with the onset of the Cold War in 1947/48 – until the collapse of Stalinism in 1989-91 did bear several different features compared with the previous period. While inter-imperialist rivalry did not disappear, it became a secondary feature. The reasons for this were, on one hand, the Cold War between the imperialist powers and the Stalinist states (most importantly the USSR) which pushed the former to join forces. On the other, it was because WWII had resulted in the clear and undisputed absolute hegemony of U.S. imperialism within the capitalist camp. In addition, this period also saw a number of anti-colonial and national liberation struggles which resulted in some important defeats for the Western powers (e.g. Vietnam War, Algeria).

 

The period between 1991 and 2008 – the year of the Great Recession – was characterized by the disappearance of Stalinist workers states and the absolute hegemony of U.S. imperialism. Other imperialist powers – Western Europe, Japan and reemerging Russia under Putin – were too weak to effectively challenge Washington. However, this period – in particular in its late phase – saw the beginning of the decline of the U.S. hegemony. The most important wars in this period were national liberation struggles like those of the Iraqi and Afghan people against the U.S. and its allies as well as of the Chechen people against Russia. Other important wars were those on the Balkans in the 1990s. in all these wars, we supported the wars of liberation against the imperialist and reactionary aggressors.

 

The current historic period which started in 2008 is characterised by the decay of capitalism reflected in economic stagnation, humanitarian and ecological catastrophes, wars and revolutionary crises. In such a period we see basically two types of conflicts: on one hand, there has been a massive acceleration of inter-imperialist rivalry mainly as a result of the rise of China and Russia as imperialist powers which are challenging the old Western imperialists. At the same time, national liberation wars (e.g. in Afghanistan until 2021 [7], the Ukraine’s war of national defence since February 2022 [8] or the current Gaza War against Israel’s genocide [9]) or progressive civil wars (in Syria against the Assad tyranny since 2011, [10] in Burma/Myanmar since the military coup in 2021 [11]) are crucial features of the world situation. [12]

 

 

 

Important changes in the social-economic physiognomy of imperialist capitalism

 

 

 

There have been several important changes in the social-economic physiognomy of imperialist capitalism in the last hundred years which Marxists have to take into account in order to understand the character of the current period and the corresponding tasks for the class struggle. Since the RCIT has already analysed these developments in much detail we limit ourselves to a brief summary and references to our studies.

 

First, there has been a dramatic shift of capitalist value production and, correspondingly, of the international working class. At the time of Lenin and Trotsky, the (semi-)colonial countries in the South were still capitalistically backward and industrial production was mostly located in the imperialist countries in North America, Western Europe and, to a lesser degree, in Japan. Correspondingly, most of the international working class was living in these imperialist states. However, this has massively changed in the past decades. In 1950 34% of the global industrial workers were living in the South, in 1980 this share has risen to about 50% and in 2013, 83.5% of all industrial workers did live and work in the semi-colonial countries and emerging imperialist China. In total, about ¾ of the global wage laborers live outside of the Western imperialist countries. [13]

 

Correspondingly, the majority of capitalist value production no longer takes place in the Western imperialist countries as the ruling class painfully noticed with all the disruptions of the global supply chains in the past years. While the U.S., Japan, Germany, France, Britain and Italy accounted for about 55% of world’s manufacturing in 1985, this share had declined to less than 30% by 2018. [14] (See also Table 1)

 

 

 

Table 1. Regional Shares of Global Industrial Value Added in 2019 [15]

 

Region                                                                         Share

 

China                                                                          24.9%

 

United States                                                             16.6%

 

Northeast Asia                                                          8.8%

 

              Japan                                                             6.4%

 

              South Korea                                                 2.4%

 

Western Europe                                                        8.7%

 

Southeast Asia (ASEAN)                                         4.8%

 

Oceania                                                                      1.6%

 

 

 

This changes basically reflect two processes. On one hand, China has emerged as a new imperialist power which is challenging the long-term hegemony of the U.S. [16] This is manifested in the fact that China has become the leading country – together with the U.S. – in the global ranking of the largest corporations in the world (as calculated by the Fortune Global 500 list in Table 2). We see the same picture when it comes to the global ranking of billionaires. (See Table 3) And while China is still behind the U.S. in military expenditures, it has already become the world’s No. 2 (U.S. 916 vs. China 296 billion U.S. Dollar). [17]

 

 

 

Table 2. Top 10 Countries with the Ranking of Fortune Global 500 Companies (2023) [18]

 

Rank                   Country                                                        Companies                      Share(in%)

 

1                          United States                                               136                                    27.2%

 

2                          China (without Taiwan)                            135                                    27.0%

 

3                          Japan                                                             41                                      8.2%

 

4                          Germany                                                      30                                      6.0%

 

5                          France                                                           23                                      4.6%

 

6                          South Korea                                                18                                      3.6%

 

7                          United Kingdom                                        15                                      3.0%

 

8                          Canada                                                         14                                      2.8%

 

9                          Switzerland                                                 11                                      2.2%

 

10                        Netherlands                                                10                                      2.0%

 

 

 

Table 3. China and U.S. Lead the Hurun Global Rich List 2021 [19]

 

                            2021                    Share of “Known” Global Billionaires 2021

 

China                  1058                    32.8%

 

U.S.                     696                      21.6%

 

 

 

On the other hand, this process reflects the increasing dependence of imperialist powers on industrial production in the Global South. Hence, the super-exploitation and control of the semi-colonial countries becomes increasingly important for the Great Powers. This is even more the case than official figures suggest (usually calculated in US-Dollars) because these distort the picture as through various mechanism – unequal exchange, currency manipulation, internal calculations within multinational corporations, etc. – the value produced in imperialist countries is overestimated while the share produced in semi-colonial countries is underestimated. [20]

 

Another important difference between the period in which Lenin and Trotsky were living in and the period after WWII is the transformation of most colonies into semi-colonies, i.e. countries which are formally political independent but continue to take a dependent and super-exploited position in the imperialist world order.

 

Furthermore, there has been a massive process of globalization, i.e. the global integration of production and trade. Between the end of WWII and the Great Recession in 2008, the ratio of goods trade to global output (Gross Domestic Product) had constantly increased from about 10% to nearly 50%. Since than this share has slightly decreased but still vacillates between 41% and 48%. [21]

 

However, with the acceleration of inter-imperialist rivalry, trade between the Western and Eastern Great Powers is decreasing while it increases within the respective blocs. A recently published study of leading economists of the IMF writes: “We find that, like during the Cold War, trade and investment between blocs is decreasing, compared to trade and investment within blocs. While the decoupling remains small compared to that earlier episode, it is also in its early stages and could worsen significantly if geopolitial tensions persists and restrictive trade policies continue to mount.[22] We allow ourselves to point out that the RCIT did already predict this development more than a decade ago when we noted: “As a result there will be a tendency towards forms of protectionism and regionalisation. Each Great Power will try to form a regional bloc around it and restrict access for the other Powers. By definition, this must result in numerous conflicts and eventual wars.[23]

 

Finally, another important change in the period since WWII has been the expansion and consolidation of the labour aristocracy in the imperialist countries. As Lenin explained, this is the top layer of the working class (e.g. certain sectors of highly-paid skilled workers) which has been bribed by the bourgeoisie with various privileges. The financial sources to pay off the labor aristocracy in the imperialist countries, and thereby to undermine its working-class solidarity, are derived from the extra profits which the monopoly capitalists obtain by super-exploiting the semi-colonial countries as well as migrants in the imperialist metropolises. Unfortunately, the labor aristocracy – along with its twin, the labor bureaucracy – plays a dominating role inside the trade unions and the reformist parties in the imperialist countries. On an ideological level, these layers play an important role to transmit aristocratic prejudices to wider layers of the popular masses directed against the oppressed people and against the lower strata of the proletariat like migrants (e.g. Islamophobia, chauvinism, support for Zionism, etc.). The RCIT has called this phenomenon as aristocratism. [24]

 

 

 

Consequences for Marxists

 

 

 

In this final chapter, we shall summarise some consequences of these changes for Marxist strategy.

 

1) Revolutionary anti-imperialism is of crucial importance in the current period since both inter-imperialist rivalry as well as imperialist aggression and national liberation struggles are key features of the world situation. It is impossible to be a communist without a consistent position of revolutionary defeatism against all Great Powers and without unconditional support for the struggles of the oppressed peoples.

 

2) Internationalism in theory and practise is essential for Marxists because the world economy is more integrated than ever and because major challenges of humanity – from the climate crisis to armament and migration – are by their very nature global issues. Advocating cross-border class struggles and the international organisation of the working class are therefore imperative to fight catastrophic capitalism. Most importantly, Marxists have to advance the unification of the proletarian vanguard and build a revolutionary world party.

 

3) Building the international workers movement and a new revolutionary world party must not be content with working in the old imperialist countries in Western Europe and North America. It must rather have a focus on the semi-colonial countries and new powers like China since it is these regions where the vast majority of the global proletariat is located.

 

4) Revolutionary work in the old imperialist countries in Western Europe and North America must have a focus on the masses of the working class in contrast to the privileged and aristocratic layers at the top or to the academic middle class milieu. This includes in particular migrants who face a double oppression (as workers and as a national minority) and who are also transmitting belts to the countries of the Global South. Revolutionaries need to work within the labour movement for unity of native and migrant workers and advocate an anti-imperialist program of solidarity with the struggles of the oppressed.

 

5) Such an orientation does go hand in hand with the conscious struggle of revolutionaries against aristocratic prejudices within the workers movement and the so-called left. Such a struggle must not be waged only on a theoretical-propagandistic level but also, and more importantly, by advocating concrete practical solidarity with the anti-imperialist struggles in the south and anti-chauvinist resistance in the imperialist countries.

 

These are some conclusions which we can draw from comparing the conditions of anti-imperialist struggles in past and present. The RCIT looks forward to exchange views with other socialist organisations and activists on this issue and to join forces in the common struggle to bring down the imperialist monster.

 



[1] See Michael Pröbsting: Anti-Imperialism in the Age of Great Power Rivalry. The Factors behind the Accelerating Rivalry between the U.S., China, Russia, EU and Japan. A Critique of the Left’s Analysis and an Outline of the Marxist Perspective, RCIT Books, Vienna 2019, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/anti-imperialism-in-the-age-of-great-power-rivalry/ (see chapter XII to XXII); by the same author: The Great Robbery of the South. Continuity and Changes in the Super-Exploitation of the Semi-Colonial World by Monopoly Capital Consequences for the Marxist Theory of Imperialism, RCIT Books, 2013, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/great-robbery-of-the-south/ (see chapter 12 and 13)

[2] For a summary of the RCIT’s understanding of revolutionary defeatism see e.g. Theses on Revolutionary Defeatism in Imperialist States, 8 September 2018, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/theses-on-revolutionary-defeatism-in-imperialist-states/

[3] L. Trotsky, G. Zinoviev, Yevdokimov: Resolution of the All-Russia Metal Workers Union (1927); in: Leon Trotsky: The Challenge of the Left Opposition (1926-27), pp. 249-250

[4] Manifesto of the Fourth International on Imperialist War: Imperialist War and the Proletarian World Revolution. Adopted by the Emergency Conference of the Fourth International, May 19-26, 1940, in: Documents of the Fourth International. The Formative Years (1933-40), New York 1973, p. 327, http://www.marxists.org/history/etol/document/fi/1938-1949/emergconf/fi-emerg02.htm

[5] Leon Trotsky: Declaration to the Antiwar Congress at Amsterdam (1932), in: Trotsky Writings 1932, p. 153

[6] For an overview about our history of support for anti-imperialist struggles in the past four decades (with links to documents, pictures and videos) see e.g. an essay by Michael Pröbsting: The Struggle of Revolutionaries in Imperialist Heartlands against Wars of their “Own” Ruling Class. Examples from the history of the RCIT and its predecessor organisation in the last four decades, 2 September 2022, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/the-struggle-of-revolutionaries-in-imperialist-heartlands-against-wars-of-their-own-ruling-class/

[7] We have compiled a number of RCIT articles on the imperialist defeat in Afghanistan on a special sub-page on our website: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/asia/collection-of-articles-on-us-defeat-in-afghanistan/

[8] We refer readers to a special page on our website where numerous RCIT documents on the Ukraine War and the current NATO-Russia conflict are compiled: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/global/compilation-of-documents-on-nato-russia-conflict/.

[10] The RCIT has published a number of booklets, statements and articles on the Syrian Revolution which can be read on a special sub-section on our website: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/africa-and-middle-east/collection-of-articles-on-the-syrian-revolution/.

[11] We refer readers to a special page on our website where all RCIT documents on the military coup in Burma/Myanmar are compiled: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/asia/collection-of-articles-on-the-military-coup-in-myanmar/.

[12] See also Michael Pröbsting: Marxist Tactics in Wars with Contradictory Character. The Ukraine War and war threats in West Africa, the Middle East and East Asia show the necessity to understand the dual character of some conflicts, 23 August 2023, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/marxist-tactics-in-wars-with-contradictory-character/

[13] For a discussion of the shift in the global proletariat with sources see e.g. Michael Pröbsting: Marxism and the United Front Tactic Today. The Struggle for Proletarian Hegemony in the Liberation Movement in Semi-Colonial and Imperialist Countries in the present Period, RCIT Books, 2016, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/book-united-front/ (chapter III); by the same author: The Great Robbery of the South. Continuity and Changes in the Super-Exploitation of the Semi-Colonial World by Monopoly Capital Consequences for the Marxist Theory of Imperialism, RCIT Books, 2013, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/great-robbery-of-the-south/ (pp. 69-80)

[14] Marceli Hazla: The trap of industry-driven development, Poznan University of Economics 2023, p. 15

[15] Wing Chu, Yuki Qian: RCEP: Asia as the Global Manufacturing Centre, Hong Kong Trade Development Council, 2 December 2021, p. 1

[16] For our analysis of capitalism in China and its transformation into a Great Power see e.g. the book by Michael Pröbsting: Anti-Imperialism in the Age of Great Power Rivalry. The Factors behind the Accelerating Rivalry between the U.S., China, Russia, EU and Japan. A Critique of the Left’s Analysis and an Outline of the Marxist Perspective, RCIT Books, Vienna 2019, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/anti-imperialism-in-the-age-of-great-power-rivalry/; see also by the same author: “Chinese Imperialism and the World Economy”, an essay published in the second edition of The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism (edited by Immanuel Ness and Zak Cope), Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2020, https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-3-319-91206-6_179-1; China: An Imperialist Power … Or Not Yet? A Theoretical Question with Very Practical Consequences! Continuing the Debate with Esteban Mercatante and the PTS/FT on China’s class character and consequences for the revolutionary strategy, 22 January 2022, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/china-imperialist-power-or-not-yet/; China‘s transformation into an imperialist power. A study of the economic, political and military aspects of China as a Great Power (2012), in: Revolutionary Communism No. 4, http://www.thecommunists.net/publications/revcom-number-4; How is it possible that some Marxists still Doubt that China has Become Capitalist? (A Critique of the PTS/FT), An analysis of the capitalist character of China’s State-Owned Enterprises and its political consequences, 18 September 2020, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/pts-ft-and-chinese-imperialism-2/; Unable to See the Wood for the Trees (PTS/FT and China). Eclectic empiricism and the failure of the PTS/FT to recognize the imperialist character of China, 13 August 2020, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/pts-ft-and-chinese-imperialism/; China’s Emergence as an Imperialist Power (Article in the US journal 'New Politics'), in: “New Politics”, Summer 2014 (Vol:XV-1, Whole #: 57). See many more RCIT documents at a special sub-page on the RCIT’s website: https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/china-russia-as-imperialist-powers/.

[17] Stockholm International Peace Research Institute: Trends in World Military Expenditure, SIPRI Fact Sheet, April 2024, p. 2

[18] Fortune Global 500, August 2023, https://fortune.com/ranking/global500/2023/ (the figures for the share is our calculation)

[19] Hurun Global Rich List 2021, 2.3.2021, https://www.hurun.net/en-US/Info/Detail?num=LWAS8B997XUP

[20] See on this The Great Robbery of the South, p. 67

[21] Gita Gopinath: Geopolitics and its Impact on Global Trade and the Dollar, IMF, 7 May 2024, https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2024/05/07/sp-geopolitics-impact-global-trade-and-dollar-gita-gopinath

[22] Gita Gopinath, Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, Andrea F. Presbitero, and Petia Topalova: Changing Global Linkages: A New Cold War? IMF Working Papers WP/24/76, April 2024, p. 14

[23] The Great Robbery of the South, p. 390

[24] For a discussion of the issue of aristocratism see e.g. our book by Michael Pröbsting: Building the Revolutionary Party in Theory and Practice, (Chapter III, iii), https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/rcit-party-building/

 

Antiimperialismo entonces y ahora

Sobre los principios del antiimperialismo ante los cambios en el capitalismo mundial

 

Por Michael Pröbsting, Corriente Comunista Revolucionaria Internacional (CCRI), 4 de junio de 2024, www.thecommunists.net

 

 

 

Contenido

 

Introducción

 

Principios del antiimperialismo

 

La relevancia de diferentes aspectos del programa antiimperialista en diferentes períodos

 

Cambios importantes en la fisonomía socioeconómica del capitalismo imperialista

 

Consecuencias para los marxistas

 

 

* * * * *


Introducción

 

 

 

Para los marxistas es un axioma que las potencias imperialistas, su rivalidad y sus guerras son una de las características clave de la etapa final del capitalismo, que en consecuencia ha sido llamada “la época del imperialismo”. Por lo tanto, es coherente que la lucha contra la agresión y las guerras imperialistas siempre haya sido una característica elemental del programa revolucionario en los tiempos modernos.

 

Si bien esto ha sido cierto desde el inicio de la época imperialista a principios del siglo XX, sería completamente erróneo imaginar que la aplicación concreta de estos principios y la relevancia de sus elementos individuales siguen siendo siempre los mismos. De hecho, la aplicación concreta de este programa depende de las características específicas de un período histórico determinado dentro de esta época.

 

En este ensayo, después de un breve resumen de los principios del antiimperialismo, explicaremos cómo estos principios tuvieron que aplicarse en los diferentes períodos del pasado y, lo más importante, cómo deben aplicarse hoy. Finalmente, discutiremos los cambios subyacentes en el capitalismo moderno que influyen en la aplicación concreta del programa antiimperialista y las consecuencias de estos cambios para la estrategia marxista.

 

 

 

Principios del antiimperialismo

 

 

 

Nos limitaremos a resumir brevemente los principios del antiimperialismo, ya que los desarrollamos con mucho detalle en dos libros y otras obras. [1] Dado que el imperialismo es un rasgo central del capitalismo moderno, la lucha contra él es un rasgo elemental de la política de la clase trabajadora. En otras palabras, es la aplicación del programa marxista y de los métodos generales de la lucha de clases al terreno de la lucha antichovinista y antimilitarista.

 

El programa marxista contra el imperialismo se basa en el axioma de que la clase trabajadora es por su propia naturaleza una clase internacional. Como tal, sus intereses contrastan marcadamente con los de la burguesía imperialista. Así como los trabajadores de una empresa determinada no tienen intereses comunes con su patrón, la clase trabajadora tampoco tiene intereses comunes con la clase dominante de un estado imperialista determinado. Todo lo contrario, así como los trabajadores quieren debilitar, derrotar y finalmente expropiar a los dueños de “su” corporación, los trabajadores de un determinado país imperialista desean debilitar, derrotar y finalmente derrocar a la clase dominante. Al mismo tiempo, los trabajadores de una empresa comparten intereses comunes con sus colegas de otras empresas, razón por la cual se organizan conjuntamente en sindicatos. Lo mismo ocurre con los trabajadores de un país, ya que comparten fundamentalmente los mismos intereses de clase que sus colegas en el extranjero.

 

Los marxistas reconocen que el capitalismo imperialista se caracteriza por la dominación global de un puñado de grandes potencias, así como de una serie de monopolios. Un sistema así se caracteriza por contradicciones irreconciliables que necesariamente provocan crisis, tensiones y guerras. Por lo tanto, refutamos la ilusión pacifista de que el capitalismo podría de alguna manera superar tales antagonismos y establecer un orden mundial capitalista pacífico –un concepto elaborado por primera vez por Karl Kautsky y luego adoptado por los socialdemócratas y estalinistas. La única manera de abolir la muerte y la destrucción a manos del militarismo venenoso es aplastar a las grandes potencias, derrocar al capitalismo gobernante y establecer una federación mundial de repúblicas obreras y campesinas mediante la revolución mundial socialista.

 

Por estas razones, los trabajadores de los países imperialistas utilizarán cada conflicto en el que esté involucrado su enemigo de clase para promover sus intereses y fortalecer su poder de lucha. Históricamente, este programa ha estado asociado con la fórmula del derrotismo revolucionario [2] que la Oposición de Izquierda dirigida por Trotsky alguna vez definió de la siguiente manera: “¿Qué se entiende por el término derrotismo? En toda la historia pasada del partido, se entendía que el derrotismo significaba desear la derrota del propio gobierno en una guerra con un enemigo externo y contribuir a esa derrota mediante métodos de lucha revolucionaria interna”. [3]

 

En la época del imperialismo, los marxistas diferencian entre tres categorías de Estados: imperialistas, (semi)coloniales y obreros (degenerados). Sin comprender la existencia de estos tres tipos fundamentales de Estados de clases, es imposible para los socialistas encontrar una orientación correcta en la época imperialista. “Enseñar a los obreros a comprender correctamente el carácter de clase del estado -imperialista, colonial, obrero- así como sus contradicciones internas, permitirá que los obreros extraigan las conclusiones prácticas co­rrectas en cada situación determinada.” [4]

 

Correspondientes a categorías tan diferentes de Estados, los marxistas básicamente diferencian entre dos tipos de guerras: guerras de opresión y guerras de liberación. Las guerras de opresión son conflictos entre dos campos reaccionarios en los que la clase trabajadora no apoya a ninguno de los lados. Ejemplos de ello son los conflictos entre estados imperialistas o las guerras civiles reaccionarias. Las guerras de liberación pueden ser la lucha de un país (semi)colonial contra una potencia imperialista, de un pueblo nacionalmente oprimido contra la nación dominante, de un campo progresista en una guerra civil o de un estado obrero (degenerado). En tales conflictos, los socialistas apoyan inequívocamente al campo antiimperialista o antireaccionario.

 

Los bandidos capitalistas siempre hacen guerras “defensivas”, aun cuando Japón marche contra Shangai y Francia contra Siria o Marruecos. El proletariado revolucionario sólo distingue entre las guerras de opresión y las guerras de liberación. El carácter de una guerra no se define por las falsificaciones diplomáticas sino por la clase que conduce la guerra y los fines objetivos que persigue con ella. Las guerras de los estados imperialistas, más allá de sus pretextos y de su retórica política, son opresivas, reaccionarias y van contra el pueblo. Sólo se puede caracterizar como guerras de liberación a aquellas que libran el proletariado y las naciones oprimidas”. [5]

 

Diferentes tipos de guerras requieren diferentes estrategias. En los conflictos entre estados imperialistas (así como en otros conflictos entre campos igualmente reaccionarios), los principios de la solidaridad internacional de la clase trabajadora requieren que los socialistas se opongan a ambos campos. Deben negarse a ponerse del lado de su propia clase dominante así como de la del campo imperialista opuesto: de la misma manera, los socialistas rechazan totalmente cualquier propaganda chauvinista de la clase dominante. En lugar de apoyar a su “propia” clase dominante, propagan la lucha de clases intransigente (siguiendo la famosa frase de Karl Liebknecht en la Primera Guerra Mundial “El enemigo principal está en casa”). Esta estrategia implica, en el caso de la guerra, tal como la formularon Lenin y el Partido Bolchevique en 1914, que los revolucionarios se esfuercen por “transformar la guerra imperialista en guerra civil”, es decir, que avancen en la lucha de los proletarios por el poder en las condiciones de guerra. Un programa así es la única manera de unir a la clase obrera internacional sobre una base internacionalista y de romper cualquier unidad “patriótica” de los trabajadores con “su” burguesía imperialista, así como con sus lacayos dentro del movimiento obrero.

 

En los conflictos entre la burguesía imperialista y los pueblos oprimidos, la CCRI llama a los trabajadores y a las organizaciones populares de todo el mundo a actuar decisivamente en el espíritu del antiimperialismo revolucionario y el internacionalismo de la clase trabajadora. Deben apoyar incondicionalmente al pueblo oprimido contra los agresores imperialistas y luchar por la derrota de estos últimos. Necesitan aplicar la táctica del frente único antiimperialista: esto significa ponerse del lado de las fuerzas que representan a estos pueblos oprimidos sin dar apoyo político a sus respectivos dirigentes (generalmente nacionalistas pequeñoburgueses o islamistas; a veces incluso estados burgueses semicoloniales). Los socialistas de los países imperialistas están obligados a luchar sin piedad contra los socialchovinistas que apoyan los privilegios de las grandes potencias, así como contra los cobardes centristas que se abstienen de apoyar activamente la lucha de los oprimidos. Los socialistas apoyan el patriotismo antiimperialista de los oprimidos y les ayudan a desarrollar una conciencia socialista e internacionalista. Sólo sobre la base de tal programa será posible para los socialistas crear las condiciones para la confianza y la unidad de los trabajadores y campesinos pobres de los pueblos oprimidos con los trabajadores progresistas de los países imperialistas. Sólo sobre esa base será posible unir a la clase trabajadora internacional sobre una base internacionalista. Sólo con tal estrategia será posible que los comunistas reemplacen a las vacilantes direcciones pequeñoburguesas de las masas oprimidas. [6]

 

 

 

La relevancia de diferentes aspectos del programa antiimperialista en diferentes períodos históricos

 

 

 

Si bien los principios de antiimperialismo antes mencionados siempre son relevantes en la época que vivimos, su aplicación concreta depende de la forma concreta del orden mundial capitalista y sus contradicciones internas. Demos una breve descripción general.

 

En el primer período de la época del imperialismo antes de 1914, las tensiones entre las potencias imperialistas (principalmente Gran Bretaña, Francia, Alemania, Rusia, Estados Unidos y Japón) fueron la característica dominante de la situación mundial. Como es bien sabido, estas tensiones resultaron en la devastadora Primera Guerra Mundial en 1914-18. Mientras que la gran mayoría de la Segunda Internacional capituló y no logró luchar consistentemente contra todas las potencias imperialistas, los bolcheviques liderados por V. I. Lenin organizaron una minoría internacionalista –que fue el núcleo de la Internacional Comunista fundada en marzo de 1919– sobre la base del programa de Derrotismo revolucionario.

 

Otra característica del período anterior a 1914, aunque menos pronunciada que lo sería más tarde, fueron las guerras coloniales de las potencias imperialistas (principalmente, pero no exclusivamente, de Gran Bretaña y Francia) contra los pueblos del Sur, respectivamente. levantamientos populares contra los opresores. Como ejemplos nos referimos a las insurrecciones antibritánicas del Movimiento Derviche en Somalia y los rebeldes Mahdistas en Sudán a finales del siglo XIX, el levantamiento de los Herero y los Namaqua contra los gobernantes alemanes en 1904-1907 o la llamada Rebelión de los Bóxers en China en 1899-1901.

 

En el período de 1914 a 1945 todos los tipos de conflictos adquirieron una expresión particularmente aguda. Este período vio dos guerras mundiales: la primera fue un conflicto sólo entre potencias imperialistas, mientras que la segunda fue una combinación de conflictos interimperialistas (Estados Unidos, Gran Bretaña y Francia contra Alemania, Italia y Japón), un conflicto entre una potencia imperialista y una nación degenerada. estado obrero (Alemania contra la Unión Soviética), así como guerras de liberación nacional (por ejemplo, China contra Japón y las guerras partisanas en la Europa ocupada por los alemanes). Además, también hubo otras guerras de liberación nacional (por ejemplo, la Guerra del Rif liderada por Abd el-Krim contra España y Francia en 1921-1926, la Gran Revuelta Siria en 1925, Japón contra China desde 1931; Italia contra Etiopía en 1935-1936), así como guerras civiles (por ejemplo, España 1936-1939) en este período.

 

En todos estos conflictos, los revolucionarios –primero los bolcheviques y la Internacional Comunista y más tarde su sucesora, la Cuarta Internacional de Trotsky– adoptaron una posición derrotista en los conflictos interimperialistas contra ambos bandos, pero apoyaron a las naciones oprimidas, a la Unión Soviética de la España antifascista en sus guerras de liberación.

 

El período posterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial –más precisamente, comenzó con el inicio de la Guerra Fría en 1947-1948– hasta el colapso del estalinismo en 1989-91 tuvo varias características diferentes en comparación con el período anterior. Si bien la rivalidad interimperialista no desapareció, pasó a ser una característica secundaria. Las razones de esto fueron, por un lado, la Guerra Fría entre las potencias imperialistas y los estados estalinistas (sobre todo la URSS), que empujó a las primeras a unir fuerzas. Por otro lado, fue porque la Segunda Guerra Mundial había resultado en una clara e indiscutible hegemonía absoluta del imperialismo estadounidense dentro del campo capitalista. Además, este período también vio una serie de luchas anticoloniales y de liberación nacional que resultaron en algunas derrotas importantes para las potencias occidentales (por ejemplo, la guerra de Vietnam, Argelia).

 

El período comprendido entre 1991 y 2008 –el año de la Gran Recesión– se caracterizó por la desaparición de los estados obreros estalinistas y la hegemonía absoluta del imperialismo estadounidense. Otras potencias imperialistas –Europa Occidental, Japón y la reemergente Rusia bajo Putin– eran demasiado débiles para desafiar efectivamente a Washington. Sin embargo, este período –en particular en su fase tardía– vio el comienzo del declive de la hegemonía estadounidense. Las guerras más importantes de este período fueron las luchas de liberación nacional como las de los pueblos iraquí y afgano contra Estados Unidos y sus aliados, así como las del pueblo checheno contra Rusia. Otras guerras importantes fueron las de los Balcanes en los años 1990. En todas estas guerras apoyamos las guerras de liberación contra los agresores imperialistas y reaccionarios.

 

El actual período histórico que comenzó en 2008 se caracteriza por la decadencia del capitalismo reflejada en estancamiento económico, catástrofes humanitarias y ecológicas, guerras y crisis revolucionarias. En un período así vemos básicamente dos tipos de conflictos: por un lado, ha habido una aceleración masiva de la rivalidad interimperialista principalmente como resultado del ascenso de China y Rusia como potencias imperialistas que desafían a los viejos imperialistas occidentales. Al mismo tiempo, guerras de liberación nacional (por ejemplo, en Afganistán hasta 2021, [7] la guerra de defensa nacional de Ucrania desde febrero de 2022 [8] o la actual guerra de Gaza contra el genocidio que comete Israel [9]) o guerras civiles progresistas (en Siria contra la tiranía de Assad desde 2011, [10] en Birmania/ Myanmar desde el golpe militar de 2021 [11]) son rasgos cruciales de la situación mundial. [12]

 

 

 

Cambios importantes en la fisonomía socioeconómica del capitalismo imperialista

 

 

 

Ha habido varios cambios importantes en la fisonomía socioeconómica del capitalismo imperialista en los últimos cien años que los marxistas deben tener en cuenta para comprender el carácter del período actual y las correspondientes tareas de la lucha de clases. Dado que la CCRI ya ha analizado estos desarrollos con mucho detalle, nos limitaremos a un breve resumen y referencias a nuestros estudios.

 

Primero, ha habido un cambio dramático en la producción de valor capitalista y, en consecuencia, en la clase trabajadora internacional. En la época de Lenin y Trotsky, los países (semi)coloniales del Sur todavía estaban capitalistamente atrasados y la producción industrial estaba ubicada principalmente en los países imperialistas de América del Norte, Europa Occidental y, en menor grado, en Japón. En consecuencia, la mayor parte de la clase trabajadora internacional vivía en estos estados imperialistas. Sin embargo, esto ha cambiado enormemente en las últimas décadas. En 1950, el 34% de los trabajadores industriales mundiales vivían en el Sur, en 1980 esta proporción aumentó a alrededor del 50% y en 2013, el 83,5% de todos los trabajadores industriales vivían y trabajaban en los países semicoloniales y en la China imperialista emergente. En total, alrededor de ¾ de los trabajadores asalariados del mundo viven fuera de los países imperialistas occidentales.  [13]

 

En consecuencia, la mayor parte de la producción de valor capitalista ya no tiene lugar en los países imperialistas occidentales, como la clase dominante notó dolorosamente con todas las perturbaciones de las cadenas de suministro globales en los últimos años. Si bien Estados Unidos, Japón, Alemania, Francia, Gran Bretaña e Italia representaban alrededor del 55% de la manufactura mundial en 1985, esta participación había disminuido a menos del 30% en 2018 [14] (ver también la Tabla 1).

 

 

 

Tabla 1. Participaciones regionales del valor agregado industrial global en 2019 [15]

 

Región                                                           Porcentaje

 

China                                                             24,9%

 

Estados Unidos                                           16,6%

 

Noreste de Asia                                           8,8%

 

     Japón                                              6,4%

 

               Corea del Sur                                2,4%

 

Europa Occidental                                     8,7%

 

Sudeste Asiático (ASEAN)                         4,8%

 

Oceanía                                                        1,6%

 

 

 

Estos cambios reflejan básicamente dos procesos. Por un lado, China ha surgido como una nueva potencia imperialista que está desafiando la hegemonía a largo plazo de Estados Unidos. [16] Esto se manifiesta en el hecho de que China se ha convertido en el país líder – junto con Estados Unidos – en el ranking mundial de las corporaciones más grandes. en el mundo (según lo calculado por la lista Fortune Global 500 en la Tabla 2). Vemos el mismo panorama cuando se trata del ranking global de multimillonarios. (Ver Tabla 3) Y aunque China todavía está detrás de Estados Unidos en gastos militares, ya se ha convertido en el segundo país del mundo (916 mil millones de dólares estadounidenses frente a 296 mil millones de dólares estadounidenses). [17]

 

 

 

Tabla 2. Los 10 principales países en el ranking de empresas Fortune Global 500 (2023) [18]

 

Clasificación       País                                   Empresas                           Participación (en%)

 

1                          Estados Unidos               136                                    27,2%

 

2                          China (sin Taiwán)          135                                    27,0%

 

3                          Japón                                   41                                      8,2%

 

4                          Alemania                            30                                      6,0%

 

5                          Francia                                23                                      4,6%

 

6                          Corea del Sur                    18                                      3,6%

 

7                          Reino Unido                      15                                      3,0%

 

8                          Canadá                               14                                      2,8%

 

9                          Suiza                                    11                                      2.2%

 

10                        Países Bajos                      10                                      2.0%

 

 

 

Tabla 3. China y EE. UU. lideran la lista global de ricos de Hurun 2021 [19]

 

                                          2021                    Proporción de multimillonarios mundiales “conocidos” 2021

 

China                               1,058                    32,8%

 

Estados Unidos               696                      21,6%

 

 

 

Por otro lado, este proceso refleja la creciente dependencia de las potencias imperialistas de la producción industrial en el Sur Global. De ahí que la superexplotación y el control de los países semicoloniales se vuelvan cada vez más importantes para las grandes potencias. Esto es aún más cierto de lo que sugieren las cifras oficiales (normalmente calculadas en dólares estadounidenses), porque distorsionan la imagen, ya que a través de diversos mecanismos (cambio desigual, manipulación monetaria, cálculos internos dentro de las corporaciones multinacionales, etc.) el valor producido en los países imperialistas es sobreestimada, mientras que la proporción producida en los países semicoloniales está subestimada. [20]

 

Otra diferencia importante entre el período que vivieron Lenin y Trotsky y el período posterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial es la transformación de la mayoría de las colonias en semicolonias, es decir, países que son formalmente independientes políticamente pero que continúan adoptando una posición dependiente y superexplotada en el mundo. orden mundial imperialista.

 

Además, ha habido un proceso masivo de globalización, es decir, de integración global de la producción y el comercio. Entre el final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y la Gran Recesión de 2008, la relación entre el comercio de bienes y la producción mundial (Producto Interno Bruto) había aumentado constantemente de alrededor del 10% a casi el 50%. Desde entonces, esta proporción ha disminuido ligeramente, pero aún oscila entre el 41% y el 48%. [21]

 

Sin embargo, con la aceleración de la rivalidad interimperialista, el comercio entre las grandes potencias occidentales y orientales está disminuyendo mientras aumenta dentro de los respectivos bloques. Un estudio publicado recientemente sobre destacados economistas del FMI escribe: “Encontramos que, como durante la Guerra Fría, el comercio y la inversión entre bloques están disminuyendo, en comparación con el comercio y la inversión dentro de los bloques. Si bien el desacoplamiento sigue siendo pequeño en comparación con el episodio anterior, también se encuentra en sus primeras etapas y podría empeorar significativamente si persisten las tensiones geopolíticas y siguen aumentando las políticas comerciales restrictivas”. [22] Nos permitimos señalar que la CCRI ya predijo este desarrollo hace más de una década cuando señalamos: “Como resultado, habrá una tendencia hacia formas de proteccionismo y regionalización. Cada Gran Potencia intentará formar un bloque regional a su alrededor y restringir el acceso de las otras Potencias. Por definición, esto debe resultar en numerosos conflictos y eventuales guerras”. [23]

 

Finalmente, otro cambio importante en el período posterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial ha sido la expansión y consolidación de la aristocracia obrera en los países imperialistas. Como explicó Lenin, se trata de la capa superior de la clase trabajadora (por ejemplo, ciertos sectores de trabajadores calificados altamente remunerados) que ha sido sobornada por la burguesía con diversos privilegios. Las fuentes financieras para sobornar a la aristocracia obrera en los países imperialistas, y con ello socavar su solidaridad obrera, se derivan de las ganancias extra que los capitalistas monopolistas obtienen superexplotando a los países semicoloniales, así como a los inmigrantes en el mundo. metrópolis imperialistas. Lamentablemente, la aristocracia obrera –junto con su gemela, la burocracia obrera– desempeña un papel dominante dentro de los sindicatos y los partidos reformistas en los países imperialistas. A nivel ideológico, estas capas juegan un papel importante para transmitir prejuicios aristocráticos a capas más amplias de las masas populares dirigidos contra el pueblo oprimido y contra los estratos más bajos del proletariado como los inmigrantes (por ejemplo, islamofobia, chovinismo, apoyo al sionismo, etc.). La CCRI ha denominado a este fenómeno aristocratismo. [24]

 

 

 

Consecuencias para los marxistas

 

 

 

En este último capítulo resumiremos algunas consecuencias de estos cambios para la estrategia marxista.

 

1) El antiimperialismo revolucionario es de crucial importancia en el período actual, ya que tanto la rivalidad interimperialista como la agresión imperialista y las luchas de liberación nacional son características clave de la situación mundial. Es imposible ser comunista sin una posición consistente de derrotismo revolucionario contra todas las grandes potencias y sin apoyo incondicional a las luchas de los pueblos oprimidos.

 

2) El internacionalismo en teoría y práctica es esencial para los marxistas porque la economía mundial está más integrada que nunca y porque los principales desafíos de la humanidad –desde la crisis climática hasta el armamento y la migración– son por su propia naturaleza cuestiones globales. Por lo tanto, defender las luchas de clases transfronterizas y la organización internacional de la clase trabajadora es imperativo para luchar contra el capitalismo catastrófico. Lo más importante es que los marxistas deben avanzar en la unificación de la vanguardia proletaria y construir un partido mundial revolucionario.

 

3) La construcción del movimiento obrero internacional y de un nuevo partido mundial revolucionario no debe contentarse con trabajar en los viejos países imperialistas de Europa occidental y América del Norte. Más bien debe centrarse en los países semicoloniales y las nuevas potencias como China, ya que son estas regiones donde se encuentra la gran mayoría del proletariado mundial.

 

4) El trabajo revolucionario en los viejos países imperialistas de Europa occidental y América del Norte debe centrarse en las masas de la clase trabajadora en contraste con las capas privilegiadas y aristocráticas en la cima o con el medio académico de clase media. Esto incluye en particular a los inmigrantes que enfrentan una doble opresión (como trabajadores y como minoría nacional) y que también están transmitiendo cinturones a los países del Sur Global. Los revolucionarios necesitan trabajar dentro del movimiento obrero por la unidad de los trabajadores nativos y migrantes y defender un programa antiimperialista de solidaridad con las luchas de los oprimidos.

 

5) Tal orientación va de la mano con la lucha consciente de los revolucionarios contra los prejuicios aristocráticos dentro del movimiento obrero y la llamada izquierda. Tal lucha no debe librarse sólo en un nivel teórico-propagandístico sino también, y más importante, abogando por una solidaridad práctica concreta con las luchas antiimperialistas en el sur y la resistencia antichovinista en los países imperialistas.

 

Estas son algunas conclusiones que podemos sacar al comparar las condiciones de las luchas antiimperialistas en el pasado y el presente. La CCRI espera intercambiar puntos de vista con otras organizaciones y activistas socialistas sobre este tema y unir fuerzas en la lucha común para derribar al monstruo imperialista.

 

 

 



[1] Véase Michael Pröbsting: Antiimperialismo en la era de la rivalidad de las grandes potencias. Los factores detrás de la creciente rivalidad entre Estados Unidos, China, Rusia, la UE y Japón. Una crítica del análisis de la izquierda y un esbozo de la perspectiva marxista, RCIT Books, Viena 2019, https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/libro-anti-imperialismo-en-la-era-de-la-rivalidad-de-las-grandes-potencias/ (ver capítulos XII y XXII); por el mismo autor: The Great Robbery of the South. Continuity and Changes in the Super-Exploitation of the Semi-Colonial World by Monopoly Capital Consequences for the Marxist Theory of Imperialism, RCIT Books, 2013, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/great-robbery-of-the-south/ (ver capítulos 12 and 13)

[2] Para un resumen de la comprensión de la CCRI sobre el derrotismo revolucionario ver, por ejemplo, Tesis sobre el derrotismo revolucionario en los estados imperialistas, 8 de septiembre 2018, https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/tesis-sobre-el-derrotismo-revolucionario-en-los-estados-imperialistas/  

[3] León Trotsky, G. Zinoviev, Yevdokimov: Resolution of the All-Russia Metal Workers Union (1927); en: Leon Trotsky: The Challenge of the Left Opposition (1926-27), pp. 249-250

[4] Manifiesto de la Cuarta Internacional sobre la guerra imperialista y la revolución proletaria mundial. Adoptado por la Conferencia de Emergencia de la Cuarta Internacional, 19 al 26 de mayo de 1940, https://ceip.org.ar/Manifiesto-de-la-Cuarta-Internacional-sobre-la-guerra-imperialista-y-la-revolucion-proletaria-mundial

[5] León Trotsky: Declaración al Congreso Contra la Guerra de Amsterdam (1932), https://ceip.org.ar/Declaracion-al-Congreso-Contra-la-Guerra

[6] Para obtener una descripción general de nuestra historia de apoyo a las luchas antiimperialistas en las últimas cuatro décadas (con enlaces a documentos, fotografías y videos), consulte, por ejemplo. un ensayo de Michael Pröbsting: La lucha de los revolucionarios en el corazón imperialista contra las guerras de su “propia” clase dominante. Ejemplos de la historia de la CCRI y su organización predecesora en las últimas cuatro décadas, 2 de septiembre de 2022, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/the-struggle-of-revolutionaries-in-imperialist-heartlands-against-wars-of-their-own-ruling-class/#anker_1

[7] Hemos recopilado una serie de artículos de la CCRI sobre la derrota imperialista en Afganistán en una subpágina especial de nuestro sitio web: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/asia/collection-of-articles-on-us-defeat-in-afghanistan/

[8] Remitimos a los lectores a una página especial en nuestro sitio web donde se compilan numerosos documentos de la CCRI sobre la guerra de Ucrania y el actual conflicto OTAN-Rusia: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/global/compilation-of-documents-on-nato-russia-conflict/

[9] Remitimos a los lectores a las páginas especiales de nuestro sitio web donde se compilan todos los documentos de la CCRI sobre la Guerra de Gaza de 2023-2024, https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/africa-and-middle-east/compilation-of-articles-on-the-gaza-uprising-2023/ y https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/africa-and-middle-east/compilation-of-articles-on-the-gaza-uprising-2023-24-part-2/

[10] La CCRI ha publicado una serie de folletos, declaraciones y artículos sobre la revolución siria que se pueden leer en una subsección especial de nuestro sitio web: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/africa-and-middle-east/collection-of-articles-on-the-syrian-revolution/

[11] Remitimos a los lectores a una página especial en nuestro sitio web donde se compilan todos los documentos de la CCRI sobre el golpe militar en Birmania/Myanmar: https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/asia/collection-of-articles-on-the-military-coup-in-myanmar/

[12] Ver también Michael Pröbsting: Tácticas marxistas en guerras de carácter contradictorio. La guerra de Ucrania y las amenazas de guerra en África occidental, Oriente Medio y Asia oriental muestran la necesidad de comprender el carácter dual de algunos conflictos,23 de agosto de 2023, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/marxist-tactics-in-wars-with-contradictory-character/#anker_2

[13] Para una discusión sobre el cambio en el proletariado global con fuentes, véase, por ejemplo, Michael Pröbsting: Marxism and the United Front Tactic Today. The Struggle for Proletarian Hegemony in the Liberation Movement in Semi-Colonial and Imperialist Countries in the present Period, RCIT Books, 2016, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/book-united-front/ (chapter III); por el mismo autor: The Great Robbery of the South. Continuity and Changes in the Super-Exploitation of the Semi-Colonial World by Monopoly Capital Consequences for the Marxist Theory of Imperialism, RCIT Books, 2013, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/great-robbery-of-the-south/ (pp. 69-80)

[14] Marceli Hazla: The trap of industry-driven development, Poznan University of Economics 2023, p. 15

[15] Wing Chu, Yuki Qian: RCEP: Asia as the Global Manufacturing Centre, Hong Kong Trade Development Council, 2 December 2021, p. 1

[16] Para nuestro análisis del capitalismo en China y su transformación en una gran potencia, véase, por ejemplo, El libro de Michael Pröbsting. Antiimperialismo en la era de la rivalidad de las grandes potencias. Los factores detrás de la creciente rivalidad entre Estados Unidos, China, Rusia, la UE y Japón. Una crítica del análisis de la izquierda y un esbozo de la perspectiva marxista, RCIT Books, Viena 2019, https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/libro-anti-imperialismo-en-la-era-de-la-rivalidad-de-las-grandes-potencias/; ver también por el mismo autor: “Chinese Imperialism and the World Economy”, an essay published in the second edition of The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism (edited by Immanuel Ness and Zak Cope), Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2020, https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-3-319-91206-6_179-1; China: una potencia imperialista… ¿o todavía no? ¡Una cuestión teórica con consecuencias muy prácticas! Continuando el Debate con Esteban Mercatante y el PTS/FT sobre el carácter de clase de China y sus consecuencias para la estrategia revolucionaria, 22 de enero de 2022, https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/china-imperialist-power-or-not-yet/#anker_1; China‘s transformation into an imperialist power. A study of the economic, political and military aspects of China as a Great Power (2012), en: Revolutionary Communism No. 4, http://www.thecommunists.net/publications/revcom-number-4; ¿Cómo es posible que algunos marxistas sigan dudando de que China se ha vuelto capitalista? (Una crítica del PTS/FT). Un análisis del carácter capitalista de las empresas estatales de China y sus consecuencias políticas, 19 de septiembre de 2020, https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/pts-ft-y-imperialismo-chino-2/; Incapaces de ver el bosque por ver los árboles. El empirismo ecléctico y la falla del PTS/FT en reconocer el carácter imperialista de China, 13 de agosto de 2020, https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/pts-ft-y-imperialismo-chino/; China’s Emergence as an Imperialist Power (Article in the US journal 'New Politics'), in: “New Politics”, Summer 2014 (Vol: XV-1, Whole #: 57). Vea muchos más documentos de la CCRI en una subpágina especial del sitio web de la CCRI: https://www.thecommunists.net/theory/china-russia-as-imperialist-powers/.

[17] Stockholm International Peace Research Institute: Trends in World Military Expenditure, SIPRI Fact Sheet, April 2024, p. 2

[18] Fortune Global 500, August 2023, https://fortune.com/ranking/global500/2023/ (the figures for the share is our calculation)

[19] Hurun Global Rich List 2021, 2.3.2021, https://www.hurun.net/en-US/Info/Detail?num=LWAS8B997XUP

[20] Ver sobre esto en The Great Robbery of the South, p. 67

[21] Gita Gopinath: Geopolitics and its Impact on Global Trade and the Dollar, IMF, 7 May 2024, https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2024/05/07/sp-geopolitics-impact-global-trade-and-dollar-gita-gopinath

[22] Gita Gopinath, Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, Andrea F. Presbitero, and Petia Topalova: Changing Global Linkages: A New Cold War? IMF Working Papers WP/24/76, April 2024, p. 14

[23] The Great Robbery of the South, p. 390

[24] Para una discusión sobre la cuestión del aristocratismo, véase, p.e. nuestro libro de Michael Pröbsting: Construyendo el Partido Revolucionario en la Teoría y en la Práctica. Viendo hacia atrás y hacia adelante después de 25 años de lucha organizada por el bolchevismo, (Capítulo III, iii), https://www.thecommunists.net/home/espa%C3%B1ol/libro-el-partido-revolucionario/

 

Anti-Imperialismo de Então & de Agora